Diastasis Rectified

My journey to heal postpartum diastasis recti


8 Comments

My 4 favorite sitting postures and how they’re getting in my way of healing this diastasis

Certification Pre-Req Pack

Whole Body Alignment Pre-Req Pack

I got my pre-requisite pack from The Restorative Exercise Institute! Giddy excitement mixed with overwhelm, that. I was up reading Alignment Matters last night and couldn’t go to sleep because of all the things to learn. You should get all this information as soon as you have a body to take care of!

There are so many new things I’m learning: my feet are like sonar for your body, my tight shoulder girdle is contributing to poochy stomach, I shouldn’t have to make noise while passing gas, menstrual cramps can be mollified, tight calves are imperative to address, poking your pelvis forward is not the same as good posture, and on and on. So many things to discuss!

Today, however, I want to talk about sitting because I sure do a lot of it. Have you ever read Dear Zoo 20 times in a row? Built 105 towers of blocks to be knocked over 105 times? Fallen asleep in childs’ pose while someone crawled onto your skull? No? Well, these are a daily occurrence for me. I no longer have to spend eight hours a day at a desk, hallelujah, but there are other challenges associated with repeated activities.

Repeated body postures tell us something, and for me I tend toward these four almost exclusively:

Image

ImageImageImage

Did I do a good job distracting you from my nursing pads on the chair?

Anyway, these are my four sitting postures. Everything else hurts almost immediately in my upper back or hips or hamstrings or somewhere. Ouch. So it’s not that these are terrible ways to posture your body but that my body is tight and loose and misaligned in certain ways that these four are the path to least resistance. For me. Yours will be different.

The “Hello Incontinence”

I think I developed that foot sitting habit during pregnancy and picked it right back up after perineal healing – because leaking. It’s always my right foot. My pelvis is tilted as a result and so my spine has to accommodate (as you can see, since my torso looks like a backwards “C”). 

The Pelvis Tucker Sacrum Crusher

Why, oh why, do I love this one so much? Clearly I’m taking any stretch out of my hamstring by tucking my pelvis and drawing up my knees. I also don’t have to activate my abdominals because my arms are holding me in a ball and I’m leaning up against the wall or couch. I tend to get numbness in butt-town on this one, but that does not stop me.

The Go-To

Always right leg over left, usually with bent over spine and shoulders. If I sit on the floor, this is always my first posture. Again, pelvis tucked or in the process of slowly tucking. I’ve been trying to cross left over right more and keep sway in my low back while not thrusting my ribs and that does not usually last long. 

The Tight Hammy

Wow, are those legs popped up or what?! I think, “oh, I’ll stretch out my legs in front of me!” and then I end up bending one because of those tight hamstrings. Instead of sitting with my pelvis in a more neutral position and using my abs to hold me up, I have to curve over and pop my legs up for it to work.

Plan of Action

  • Stretch the hamstrings the right way
  • Open up the shoulders on a bolster
  • Ribs down
  • MIX IT UP WITH DIFFERENT POSTURES. I have to be really aware of trying new positions, even if they feel weird. These four are like perfectly well-worn shoes that feel so soft and familiar.
  • Psoas release and stretch (will post more about this later)

What are your favorite go-to sitting postures and what do they tell you about your body? 

Advertisements


4 Comments

Rib thrusting, diastasis recti, and where to go from here

Bellies 2014

I am almost done with the Psoas course from The Restorative Exercise Institute and I am here to report that I am a rib thruster. Notice in the second photo from the right how the bottom of my rib cage is in front of my ASIS (your ASIS is the bony part of your pelvis in the front that is commonly mistaken for a hip bone). This shortens my psoas muscles, shifts the way my body carries its own weight, and increases pressure in all the wrong places. I would explain more, but I’m not an expert. Yet.

This, and other misalignments, help explain explain why Mutu isn’t giving me the results I want. I don’t meant the appearance I want but rather the body function. The machine of my body is more like the ’89 Volvo with the electrical problem that would leave me stranded in the middle of the highway (literally in the middle…of a lane…it would just shut off) and less like the aerodynamic Teslas I see zipping around the city. For example, I was out of commission for days last week with a debilitating neck and back spasm which my 22lb 9mo was only too happy to accommodate [sarcasm]. I have felt like the work I’m doing, while having some visually obvious effect on my body, has not been addressing the full root of the problem. It’s like if you put fertilizer on a plant whose soil is too acidic or alkaline – you are not going to help the plant until you adjust the soil.

I believed I was fixing my “soil” with zero drop shoes and some lifestyle changes, but I’m seeing now that the more fundamental problems require more extensive changes Habits I’ve learned over literally decades (dating all the way back to my first ballet class at 4) and things drilled into me in the Exercise Science building at my college or in the group classroom at the gym not only contributed to this problem in the first place but are preventing me from being well.

BUT WAIT, it’s not all sad panda around here! I am on a trajectory to fix these underlying issues. While Wendy does base many of her exercises on Katy’s work, I need more information and practical knowledge. I need to understand all the “whys” because that’s just the kind of woman I am, I guess. It won’t affect change in me until I really “get” it, that much I know is true. That’s why I have signed up to complete the first step of the certification program to become a Restorative Exercise Specialist. It’s a nice goal to have, but in end systems are more important than goals. So, part of my “system” is to continue to integrate what I’m learning and applying into this blog and pass on the information to all of you with separated bellies wondering if it can even get better. Together we can create healthier, happier bodies that work with us and not against us. I hope you’ll join me. 🙂